Wednesday, December 3, 2008

My Last Name

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.


I found this online regarding my last name (Lehane) and thought it was pretty cool.


Among the interesting tidbits I ran across is the meaning of the origin of the name, which I got from the Ancestry.com website. "Lehane" is a reduced Anglicized form of the Gaelic 'Ó Liáithan', meaning 'a descendant of Liáithan', a personal name from a diminutive of 'liáth' which translates as 'gray'. Therefore 'Ó Liáithan' translates to English as 'a descendant of Gray'. This opens the remote possibility, that the Gray and Lehane family lines share a distant but common ancestry.


And regarding my last name, I was listening to this song and it made me think of the post.

Friday, November 21, 2008

100 Greatest Books #79 - The BFG

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.


The BFG by Roald Dahl is listed on both the Observer and BBC Lists.


The BFG is children's book about a little girl who discovers a Big Friendly Giant (AKA BFG). There is also other giants along with the BFG who are not so friendly, because they eat people. So the little girl convinces the BFG to take the bad giants down. This actually is a rather gruesome story for a child but as I read online it is the perfect children's book, although the making up of words does get a bit tiresome after a while. The story has clear cut morality issues and includes a heroine who is just your everyday kid. It is a good story for kids that parents do not need to be too worried about. Enjoyable, just not my cup of tea.

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

100 Greatest Books #78 - Robinson Crusoe

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.


Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe is listed on both on the Sybervision and Observer book lists.



I got the feeling while I was reading this of Cast Away a lot. I know there were several people out there who thought that movie was boring. Well the book came across the same way. It just seemed to drag on for me. Every other page at the beginning I was expecting him to become ship wrecked, then when he finally was, nothing exciting happened. For a book that seemed to be billed as an action-adventure novel I got none of that through the narrative. It's not a totally bad book and I enjoyed the plot, I just felt it was really slow at times. I found it amusing how no matter what Robinson did he seemed to end up on the short end of things, although I found it irritating that all Native Americans/ Native Islanders were referred to as savages and cannibals. I can see how they might be thought of that way in the story until you meet them but Defoe continued to show them eating humans. Sorry but cannibalism was not that widespread.

Monday, August 25, 2008

100 Greatest Books #77 - Trilogy: Molloy, Malone Dies, & The Unnamable

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.


The next compilation of books is listed on the Norwegian book list and also Malone Dies is listed on the Observer book list.




The Trilogy at first reminded me of Ulysses, which if anyone has noticed, I despised. But Beckett soon broke away from the incessant ramblings that plagued that novel and gave two really good stories, Molloy and Malone Dies. The novels are written with all emotion removed and in a rather cryptic way that keeps the reader guessing as you read on. The second half of Molloy seems like the second half of the story, but as you read you get the feeling it may be the prelude to the first half. Malone Dies at first seems to be completely disjointed from the first novel but reading on you get the feeling it may be Molloy and is just a continuation of the first novel. In the third novel, The Unnamable, Beckett returns to the rambling speech that is full of run-on sentences saying nothing. If it was not for the last novel I might recommend this but the last novel killed it for me. Unfortunately you need to read all three to get the entire feel for the novels. So although I somewhat enjoyed parts of it, I can not recommend this as a novel to be read.

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

100 Greatest Books #76 - Self-Reliance

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.

The next book on the list was a very short one, hence the quick update. It is Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson.




Assuming I have the right essay, since there are 3 different Nature essays, this was a very short read. Although it did improved my opinion of Emerson. The first story that I read of his, Nature, was difficult to understand what he was talking about at times. Self-Reliance was anything but difficult. It was straight forward and actually provided a good lesson. The essay was about how man (and woman) have become too reliant on other people and things and that they are no longer their own person. He stated that we needed to break free of the things we rely on to truly become individuals. Only the individuals are remembered through history, not the ones who just copied other people. You can also find this one online HERE.


This book can be found on the Sybervision Book list.

Sunday, July 13, 2008

100 Greatest Books #75 - Nature

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.

The next book read on the list is Nature by Ralph Waldo Emerson.


This one threw me through a loop. Emerson wrote 3 different things entitled Nature. I was resolved to read all of them until I came across a website that stated that his first work (1936) was the most prominent and it is the only work before Self-Reliance. And since the works were listed chronologically, I assumed that this must be the one. It was not all together as exciting as I thought it would be. By far Thoreau seemed to have the same ideals but portrayed them better. Not my favorite of philosophers but I can see how it might have been groundbreaking at the time. You can read it online HERE.

This book can be found on the Sybervision Book list.

Friday, July 4, 2008

100 Greatest Books #74 - The Importance of Being Earnest

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.

And fast on the heals of my last book is my next book read. The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde


The one thing I love about reading plays it that they are fast. You get the introduction, the conflict, and the resolution all within about 2 hours. This play was one of the shorter ones and it was rather funny. It is about a made up person named Earnest and two men who pretend to be him. Both who get engaged to different women. As you can imagine, hilarity ensues (I had to say that). It is a very fast paced narrative and the situations are not altogether unbelievable. I rather enjoyed it and will place it on my recommended reading list.

This book is on the Sybervision and My Book lists.

Thursday, July 3, 2008

100 Greatest Books #73 - Tom Jones

Note - This review was originally published on my other site "The Geology P.A.G.E." but due to the content I have moved it here and backdated the post.

Since I usually update my website with the review of books that I have read and I once did it here (look to when I started my blog) I figured I would do it here again. My review now is of the 73rd book I have read on my quest to read the 100 greatest books (Hence the blog post title) - Tom Jones by Henry Fielding


Although it is a rather long book (my copy was over 850 pages) I did greatly enjoy reading it. The author is more of a narrator then an impartial observer. He readily makes comments throughout the book that makes you feel like you are sitting by a fire listening to him relay the story. It was definitely a different approach then most I have read and I greatly enjoyed it. The story was exquisite. It is about a bastard, Tom, who was abandoned by his mother to be raised by a very benevolent man. Although I did not readily agree with some of the lessons at the end of the book (how birth makes more of a difference on who the boy is, not just his character) I still enjoyed it and the ending did bring a tear to my cheek. I thought that how the author kept making Tom's situation worse and worse that there was no way to bring him back in a believable manner, but it worked out and rather well at that. I definitely enjoyed this book and recommend it to anyone with a few months to read it.


The book can be found on the Sybervision, Observer and My Book lists